California Conservation Success Stories

Browse our Growing Library of Success Stories

Serenity In The Slough

By:

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with partners to recover the southern sea otter and educate the public about their important role in our coastal ecosystems. 

 

A Cud Above

By:

Through a public-private agreement, the ranchers graze their cattle on a 719-acre vernal pool grassland at the Warm Springs unit of the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. With this pact, they’re keeping alive a ranching and land conservation heritage spanning four generations. The grazing, in turn, offers a host of benefits for endangered species at the seasonal pond.

 

A Marriage of Opposites

By:

Nadya Seal Faith is a conservation biologist with the Santa Barbara Zoo; Luke Faith is a foreman for Seneca Resources Inc., an oil-production company.

 

Sweet Present, Rich Past

By:

Berry grower embraces conservation and history

 

A Promising Future For a California Plant Once Believed Extinct

By:

How a Southern California developer helped save the San Fernando Valley spineflower

 

Full Belly Farm

By:

Full Belly FarmLocated northwest of Sacramento, Full Belly Farm is co-owned by Andrew Brait, Paul Muller, Judith Redmond and Dru Rivers. They began farming together in the 1980’s when many farms were failing and there was no established organic produce marketing system.

 

Giacomazzi Dairy

By:

Giacomazzi DairyDino Giacomazzi is a fourth-generation dairy farmer whose farm is comprised of 900 dairy cows on 900 acres in Hanford where the farm has operated since 1893. Dino represents what it means to farm responsibly and sustainably, enhancing natural resources as part of his work.

 

Koopmann Ranch

By:

Koopmann RanchTim Koopmann is a third generation rancher who owns and operates an 850 acre cow-calf operation in Sunol. The Koopmanns’ ranch is an agricultural gem surrounded by development.

 

Lange Twins Wine Estates

By:

Lange Twins Wine EstatesBrad and Randy Lange are third-generation winegrape growers on their 6,500-acre Lange Twins Wine Estates vineyard near Lodi. The Langes have improved natural habitat on their property through restoration of a riparian area along the Mokelumne River and the implementation of unique, eco-friendly pest-control methods.

 

Lone Star Ranch

By:

Lone Star RanchLocated near Eureka in Humboldt County, the 5,000-acre, fifth-generation Lone Star Ranch is a shining example of diversity and environmental stewardship. The ranch is owned by Mark and Dina Moore, who are both strong believers in voluntary conservation practices, often striving to exceed the minimum regulatory obligations to improve and sustain natural resources, wildlife and ecosystems. Their mission is to “leave a legacy of stewardship and long term financial security to the ranch and children”.

 

Lundberg Family Farms

By:

Lundberg Family Farms The Lundberg family’s commitment to agricultural conservation can be traced back to the ravages of the Dust Bowl.

 

Montna Farms

By:

Montna FarmsAl Montna, whose family has been farming in California since the late 1800s, has grown various crops through the years, such as peaches, prunes, wheat, and walnuts. Today, his Montna Farms consists of more than 2,500 acres of specialty short grain rice.

 

Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Company

By:

Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese CompanyBob and Dean Giacomini purchased a dairy from Bob’s father and ran their fluid milk business while raising four daughters on the farm in coastal Marin County.

 

Prather Ranch

By:

Prather RanchJim and Mary Rickert have worked in production agriculture all of their lives, developing a deep love for the land and wildlife on the many acres they manage. Hired in 1979 by the original owner of Prather Ranch, the Rickerts have responsibly managed the land and recently became majority owners. Under their care, Prather Ranch has grown from 3,000 acres of pasture, hay and timberland, to over 35,000 acres.

 

Red Rock Ranch

By:

Red Rock RanchJohn Diener’s Red Rock Ranch consists of approximately 5,000 acres in Fresno County. He farms an array of high value row crops, using innovative approaches to land, water, and wildlife management.

 

Sierra Orchards

By:

Sierra OrchardsCraig McNamara’s 450-acre Sierra Orchards is a diversified farming operation that includes field, processing, and marketing operations and produces organic walnuts and grape rootstock. Sierra Orchards is proof that an agricultural operation is able to be green without going into the red.

 

Thomson International, Inc.

By:

Thomson International, Inc.Jeff Thomson’s great-grandfather, C.B. Crawford, began farming near his 160-acre homestead in 1888. After the farm’s water source ran dry, he became a market duck hunter on Jerry Slough, 40 miles west of Bakersfield. With money saved from duck sales, C.B. bought several farming parcels that are still farmed by the Thomson family today.

 

Three Creeks Ranch

By:

Three Creeks RanchChet Vogt’s Three Creeks Ranch in Glenn County is a 5,300 acre 500 cow/calf operation. The core of Chet’s holistic approach to ranching is intensive managed grazing, which rotates the cattle among 32 fenced paddocks.

 

Creating a Fire Resilient Landscape in the Pisgah National Forest

By:

On July 14, 2015, a lightning strike ignited a wildfire on Bald Knob in the Grandfather Ranger District (GRD) of the Pisgah National Forest. Only 30 miles outside of Asheville, North Carolina and on rugged terrain difficult to access, the wildfire may have posed greater threat had it not been adjacent to areas containing recent fuel treatments (prescribed fire) and wildfires. These treatments, as part of the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), reduced fire fuel loads in the forest and enabled the Bald Knob fire to safely burn while protecting firefighters, local residents, structures, power line corridors, communication towers, and Forest Service property and surrounding land. Fuel treatments positively influenced the fire’s spread and allowed firefighting efforts to truly focus on protection of private properties. The inaccessible terrain as well as the confine and contain strategy allowed ample time to keep the effected community well informed of current fire behavior, smoke impacts and management plans for the fire.

 

Prescribed Fire Program Reduces Wildfire Severity

By:

Over four long days in late March 2011, the most severe wildfire outbreak in a decade occurred at Eglin Air Force Base, located near Destin, Florida (Fig. 1). A persistent drought, 20 mph winds and low humidity, combined with 12-15 arson fires on the property, resulted in 6,000 acres burned in a matter of days. Due to Eglin’s aggressive prescribed fire program, the March 2011 wildfire severity and acres burned were significantly reduced. Without this regular fuel reduction, anywhere from 10-12,000 acres could have burned just on the Eglin side, with untold acres burned and property damaged north of Interstate 10.